What’s APPlicable?

It’s Business Tuesday again, and today’s topic happens to be two brand new apps!  Yes, I know that I usually talk about the more human aspect of business, and it may seem odd to readers and visitors to read an article on apps, but rest assured there’s a human aspect to what I’m sharing.

The first app was created by three teens from Georgia.  Three savvy teens who thought having a police-themed app would prove helpful came up with a Yelp-influenced app that allows users to post feedback — good and not so good — about police interactions in a person’s community.  The creators are sisters 16-year-old Ima and 15-year-old Asha, and their brother, 14-year-old Caleb Christian.

According to Ima, this is a positive solution app that even provides a “Know Your Rights” tab with a summary of what rights an individual has when stopped by the police and removes much of the confusion that can sometimes come from interacting with the police.  Rather than polarize the police and the community, this app is meant to draw them together because positive interactions rarely lead to negative reactions.

Taking a page out of pop culture, they aptly named the app, “Five-O.”  And yes, the app is available for all formats.

Kudos to these entrepreneurial teens for seeing a problem and creating a positive solution to address that problem.

The second app is one that also saw a problem that needed to be addressed.  Sharon Standifird in Texas decided that instead of dealing with the frustration and worry that came with her teens not answering her calls and texts in a timely fashion, she would find a way to take that issue to task and wrestle it to the ground.

Much less tech savvy than the Georgia teens, Sharon — who didn’t even know how to code — researched how to develop an app and created “Ignore No More.”  The app allows parents to lock their children’s cellphones until they call back.  Once the lock is put on the phone, a user can only make one of two calls:  a call to the parent or a call to 911 in case of emergencies.

Everything else on the phone is inaccessible.  No more texting. No more gaming.  No more phoning friends.  No talking to friends if you’re in the middle of a phone conversation.  No more surfing the Internet.  Not until the phone is unlocked and for that to happen, all user has to do is do an E.T. and phone home.

The best part about this app is that no developer can take it off the phone once it’s been installed.  It can’t be disabled.  It can’t be modified.  And anyone trying to hack the app is going to be in for a world of woah!

And like the first app that has a “Know Your Rights” tab, the second app has an exhaustive FAQ tab.

Currently “Ignore No More” is only avaialble on Android, however, the iOS version will be available very soon.

What I like about both these apps is that people who saw a need didn’t let inexperience or age or anything else prevent them from creating a workable solution to address the need they identified.  The siblings, while tech savvy, don’t have life’s experience on their side; the mom, while parent savvy, didn’t have tech abilities on her side.  Both parties found ways to address those shortcomings to achieve their goals.

This is what success is all about:  effort, dedication, and focus.  As long as you keep the goal in sight, and no matter how many times you may fail in your journey to achieve the goal, it is inevitable that you will eventually succeed in your mission.  Don’t lose sight of what matters to you as an entrepreneur.

Elyse Bruce

Who Said That?

The graduates of McGill University who finished their degrees after World War II ended are the great-grandparents and great-great-grandparents of those who are graduating from university and college over 65 years later.  The quotes beside each graduates’ name speaks volumes of how they interpreted the world around them.  Since most of the quotes fail to acknowledge the author of the quote, I thought it would be fun to see how many of these quotes are recognized by those who follow or visit my blog.  Today’s quote is this:

Be wisely worldly, not worldly wise.

Feel free to add the name of who you believe was — or may have been — the person who first spoke or first wrote those words, in the Comments Section below.

Who Said That?

The graduates of McGill University who finished their degrees after World War II ended are the great-grandparents and great-great-grandparents of those who are graduating from university and college over 65 years later.  The quotes beside each graduates’ name speaks volumes of how they interpreted the world around them.  Since most of the quotes fail to acknowledge the author of the quote, I thought it would be fun to see how many of these quotes are recognized by those who follow or visit my blog.  Today’s quote is this:

And I would that my tongue would utter the thoughts that arise in me.

Feel free to add the name of who you believe was — or may have been — the person who first spoke or first wrote those words, in the Comments Section below.

Elkmont Nature Trail

No matter where you may wander in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, every turn opens up to new wonders and splendors you could not have anticipated.  Whether it’s a well-traveled hiking trail or a lesser traveled nature trail, nature awaits you.

Photography / Videography:  Elyse Bruce
Music:  “Solitude” by Elyse Bruce
Copyright © Elyse Bruce, 2014

An Amazing Cover Reveal

Cover reveals are exactly what you think they are.  The covers of soon-to-be released books are revealed in the days leading up to the book’s launch date.

Since April, I’ve posted articles about the upcoming “Amazing Adventures” anthology, sometimes talking about the pulp fiction genre and sometimes talking about the illustrations.

April 6, 2014
Style Is Everything

This article provided an easy-to-follow synopsis of the genre, and shared the names of some popular authors who not only wrote in the style for which they are best known, but who also wrote pulp fiction.    Authors such as Isaac Asimov, Ray Bradbury, Edgar Rice Burroughs, Agatha Christie, Arthur C. Clark, Arthur Conan Doyle, Robert A. Heinlein, Mark Twain, H.G. Wells, and Tennessee Williams.

April 13, 2014
Being Creative Is Serious Business

The following week, I wrote about — and shared — some of the illustrations “Amazing Adventures.”  I wrote about the importance of paying attention to details and being serious about the work while remembering to set aside some time to have fun and cast seriousness aside from time to time.

May 04, 2014
It’s In The Details

With so many short stories to illustrate, each story brought with it its own demands in terms of style and presentation.  While some may say a gun is a gun is a gun, that’s not so.  A weapon is as unique in appearance as the person holding — and using — it, but especially so in literature.  What’s interesting here is that one of the illustrations discussed was subsequently replaced be another illustration that I felt was more representative of the story.  And why would I do a second illustration for a short story when both the author and editor were pleased with the first version?  Because a successful illustration is one where the artist realizes that it’s in the details.

June 3, 2014
It Starts With An Attitude

While this article wasn’t just about “Amazing Adventures” per se, I wrote about optimism v pessimism v realism in working with so many authors and an editor as we forged ahead to create a cohesive anthology.  Once again, I addressed the point that details were of paramount importance because they are.

July 13, 2014
Amazing Adventures For All

Knowing that everything was finally falling into place as I put my pencils and sketches and brushes and paints to rest (but only for a short period as I am currently illustrating a children’s book), it was time to mention not only the stories but some of the details about the illustrations.  Thanks to the challenges and opportunities that “Amazing Adventures” brought into my life, I have a new-found understanding and appreciation for weapons (not to mention a rather impressive collection of weaponry sketches to draw upon should the need arise to illustrate more murder-mystery stories in 2015).

And this takes us to today’s article titled, “An Amazing Cover Reveal.”

Not only did I create the illustrations for 12 stories (one of which was mine, “All The Sleepy Dancers Gone”), I also created the illustrations for the front and back covers.  The most challenging part of illustrating the front cover was that I wanted it to be an inclusive cover.  In other words, I wanted the illustration to be one that any (or all) of the main characters in each of the stories could be drawn to for any number of reasons.

The sheets are elegant and inviting.  The revolver is both expensive and aesthetic while at the same time cold and menacing.  The billfold is one that doesn’t stand out in a crowd.  And the money … well, with authors from so many locales, and with characters from so many locales, it made perfect sense to have American and Canadian dollars alongside Euros … for those quick escapes across the border … any border.  And if you’re going to escape, a passport is imperative regardless of whether it’s a legitimate passport or a counterfeit.

And so, with no further delays, I am revealing the  cover for the “Amazing Adventures” anthology, available for purchase next Tuesday, August 19 at major online bookstores and at major download portals everywhere.

Cover Idea #1_Small

Stay tuned as next week, I’ll have more news about this book along with links to where you can buy a copy for your private library.  I’ll also have a couple other nice surprises … and all of them related to this book!

Elyse Bruce

 

Who Said That?

The graduates of McGill University who finished their degrees after World War II ended are the great-grandparents and great-great-grandparents of those who are graduating from university and college over 65 years later.  The quotes beside each graduates’ name speaks volumes of how they interpreted the world around them.  Since most of the quotes fail to acknowledge the author of the quote, I thought it would be fun to see how many of these quotes are recognized by those who follow or visit my blog.  Today’s quote is this:

Sufficient unto the day is the evil thereof.

Feel free to add the name of who you believe was — or may have been — the person who first spoke or first wrote those words, in the Comments Section below.

Who Said That?

The graduates of McGill University who finished their degrees after World War II ended are the great-grandparents and great-great-grandparents of those who are graduating from university and college over 65 years later.  The quotes beside each graduates’ name speaks volumes of how they interpreted the world around them.  Since most of the quotes fail to acknowledge the author of the quote, I thought it would be fun to see how many of these quotes are recognized by those who follow or visit my blog.  Today’s quote is this:

Rarely, rarely comest though spirit of delight.

Feel free to add the name of who you believe was — or may have been — the person who first spoke or first wrote those words, in the Comments Section below.

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