Who Said That?

The graduates of McGill University who finished their degrees after World War II ended are the great-grandparents and great-great-grandparents of those who are graduating from university and college over 65 years later.  The quotes beside each graduates’ name speaks volumes of how they interpreted the world around them.  Since most of the quotes fail to acknowledge the author of the quote, I thought it would be fun to see how many of these quotes are recognized by those who follow or visit my blog.  Today’s quote is this:

Nothing is at last sacred but the integrity of your own mind.

Feel free to add the name of who you believe was — or may have been — the person who first spoke or first wrote those words, in the Comments Section below.

End Of The Innocence

End Of The Innocence” is the 11th book I’ve published to date, and by far the darkest in tone.  The novella tells the story of high school principal, Trevor Raines, and his interactions with students at St. Bernardino Secondary School, with one student in particular — Nathan Lane Covington — proving to be more problematic than all the rest.

End_Of_The_Innocence_Cover_for_Kindle

When I finished the first draft, the student’s name was originally Roger Lane Elliot, but after the unspeakable incident in California where Elliot Rodger reportedly injured and killed so many back in May, I had to set the novel aside.

I was in a quandary as to what I should do.  The story was well-crafted, and one I had put considerable research and effort into writing.  It flowed well and provided a number of jump off points where readers could discuss any number of current situations happening in society with others (regardless of whether they were reading the same book).

I turned to a handful of literary colleagues and asked their opinion on the matter.  Each of them suggested that I set the first draft aside for 6 to 8 weeks, return to it, change the student’s name, and move ahead as usual.  I wasn’t sure that was the way to go, but I did think it was prudent to set the story aside for a month or two while I decided what to do.

Upon returning to the story earlier this month, and reading it from start to finish, I came to the conclusion that while the name of the character and the name of the student in Isla Vista may have been eerily similar (in fact, nearly identical), the story itself was one that needed to be told as well as shared.  And so, I returned to work on the story … revising it, adding parts, removing parts, proofing, and editing.

And Roger Lane Elliot became Nathan Lane Covington (thank goodness no one by the name of Covington decided to go on some sort of rampage on the day “End Of The Innocence” was published).

For those of you who enjoy reading the “Missy Barrett Adventures” series as well as the Missy Barrett Conversation series, this novella is the antithesis of everything you’ve come to love about Missy Barrett (who, by the way, turns 9 at the end of August).   Now, this doesn’t mean that readers will come away hating Nathan Lane Covington.  It means that Lane will make you think differently about certain things than you already think … and not necessarily for the best either.

Thomas D. Tayor, an author in his own right, wrote the Foreword, sharing his view on not only the story, but on how society is forced to address the reality of our youth these days.  While his comments are brief, they, too, are very telling.

So, what’s the story about, you ask.  Here’s a brief synopsis:

A principal’s job is one that requires more than just a college diploma and the drive to move up the management ladder. It can be rewarding but rest assured, it can also be taxing. With the axis of power shifting in society, what does this mean for Trevor Raines, principal of St. Bernardino Secondary School? It means the job requires a bit more finesse and a lot more paperwork … especially when Nathan Lane Covington is registered for classes at the school.

“End Of The Innocence” is a psychological thriller guaranteed to keep readers glued to the page as they make their way through the day with Trevor Raines and Nathan Lane Covington. What first seems to be a difficult situation soon becomes one that ends in ways no one could have imagined when the first school bell rang that morning.

Wouldn’t you like to know what happened between the first and the last school been of the day?  Of course you would.

To buy the eBook edition of this book, click HERE.  To buy the paperback edition of this book, click HERE or HERE.

And remember to share the links with others on your social media accounts as well as in email exchanges.

Elyse Bruce

Who Said That?

The graduates of McGill University who finished their degrees after World War II ended are the great-grandparents and great-great-grandparents of those who are graduating from university and college over 65 years later.  The quotes beside each graduates’ name speaks volumes of how they interpreted the world around them.  Since most of the quotes fail to acknowledge the author of the quote, I thought it would be fun to see how many of these quotes are recognized by those who follow or visit my blog.  Today’s quote is this:

Time is capital: invest it well.

Feel free to add the name of who you believe was — or may have been — the person who first spoke or first wrote those words, in the Comments Section below.

Smokemont Baptist Church

Sometimes, it’s the little hidden away places that have the greatest impact on a hiker’s soul.  Smokemont Baptist Church in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park is one of those places.

Photography:  Elyse Bruce
Original Music:  Elyse Bruce
Copyright © Elyse Bruce, 2014

Photoshop Your Memories

While it’s true that we all put our best foot forward whether in our personal lives or in our professional lives, it’s important to keep in mind that putting your best foot forward doesn’t mean misleading others into believing things that may or may not have a basis in fact.

I pondered how I could impart the importance of being transparent in business and personal dealings, and decided that one of the best ways to impress this upon readers and visitors was to share this video from Rhett and Link.  Enjoy!

Who Said That?

The graduates of McGill University who finished their degrees after World War II ended are the great-grandparents and great-great-grandparents of those who are graduating from university and college over 65 years later.  The quotes beside each graduates’ name speaks volumes of how they interpreted the world around them.  Since most of the quotes fail to acknowledge the author of the quote, I thought it would be fun to see how many of these quotes are recognized by those who follow or visit my blog.  Today’s quote is this:

Surely not in vain my substance of the common Earth was ta’en.

Feel free to add the name of who you believe was — or may have been — the person who first spoke or first wrote those words, in the Comments Section below.

Bach, Department Stores, and Movies

I love Johann Sebastian Bach (31 March 1685 – 28 July 1750).  I love his fugues. I love his toccatas.  I love his concertos, his passions, his cantatas … well, I pretty much love everything Bach ever wrote.  And others over the centuries love everything Bach ever wrote.  Why, even Ludwig von Beethoven (another composer whose music I adore) said that, as far as he was concerned, Bach was the “original father of harmony.”

All right, bottom line here is that I love Bach and nearly all of his music.  Cue the applause from other Bach and classical music fans and aficionados.

I also happen to love pop culture.  I loved the 1988 Penny Marshall directed movie, “BIG” starring Tom Hanks, Elizabeth Perkins, and Robert Loggia.  The story line was engaging; the acting was just right.  In one of the scenes, Tom Hanks and Robert Loggia are walking through the department store when this happens.

Years later — 26 to be exact — the piano is still found in the department store where the scene was filmed.  And not only is it still in the department store, it’s still being played!  The best part is that there are staff members with some classical training who give performances on this piano.

So what does this have to do with Johann Sebastian Bach?  Click on this video and you’ll see for yourself.

Now, wasn’t that worth the time watching those two video clips?  I think so.  And if you didn’t really know or like Johann Sebastian Bach before today, perhaps you have a new respect for his music and how virtuosity comes in many forms.

Elyse Bruce

 

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