Science Proved This To Be True

For those of you who were teens in the 50s, you undoubtedly remember the uproar that rock’n’roll caused most adults. It broke all sorts of rules and the lyrics mentioned sex in some of the more outrageous songs sung by performers who gyrated wildly on stage. It was the Devil’s music. It promoted sex, drugs and, well, rock’n’roll, and threatened to bring society to its knees.

Music To Demonize: Rock’n’Roll.

When the 60s heralded in the free love generation, adults were in an uproar over that as well. Like the music from the previous decade, it broke all sorts of rules and the lyrics mentioned sex in some of the more outrageous songs sung by performers who gyrated wildly on stage. It was the Devil’s music. It promoted sex, drugs and, well, rock’n’roll, and threatened to bring society to its knees.

Music To Demonize: Psychedelic Rock, Progressive Rock, Garage Rock, and Protest Music with a Message

Thank goodness the 70s hit, because that generation brought disco to the forefront. But alas, it, too, broke all sorts of rules and the lyrics mentioned sex in some of the more outrageous songs sung by performers who gyrated wildly on stage. It was the Devil’s music. It promoted sex, drugs and, well, rock’n’roll, and threatened to bring society to its knees.

Music To Demonize: Disco, Progressive Rock, Punk, New Wave, and Glam Rock.

Surely the 80s were going to be a much more rational decade for music but little did the adults know that they weren’t different, just more slick and more subtle than previous generations. The music of this decade broke all sorts of rules and the lyrics mentioned sex in some of the more outrageous songs sung by performers who gyrated wildly on stage. Adults were in an uproar It was the Devil’s music. It promoted sex, drugs and, well, rock’n’roll, and threatened to bring society to its knees.

Music To Demonize: New Wave, Synth-Pop, Hair Metal, Hip-Hop, Gothic Rock, Heavy Metal, and Hardcore Punk.

By the time the 90s hit, and rap and hip hop were making waves, adults were at it again, decrying the awful influence music had on youth. The songs played on the radio broke all sorts of rules and the lyrics mentioned sex in some of the more outrageous songs sung by performers who gyrated wildly on stage. Adults were in an uproar It was the Devil’s music. It promoted sex, drugs and, well, rock’n’roll, and threatened to bring society to its knees.

Music To Demonize: Grunge, Technotronic, Hip-Hop, Gangster Rap, Pop-Punk, Metal, Hard Rock, and Happy Rock.

With the start of the new millennium, hope was renewed among adults but once again, as in previous decades, those hopes were dashed in short order as the songs broke all sorts of rules and the lyrics mentioned sex in some of the more outrageous songs sung by performers who gyrated wildly on stage. Adults were in an uproar yet again. It was the Devil’s music. It promoted sex, drugs and, well, rock’n’roll, and threatened to bring society to its knees.

Music To Demonize: Emo, Pop-Punk, Hip-Hop, Hard Rock, Alternative Metal, New Wave Revival, Internet Stars, and former Disney Artists.

But all that changed once we made it to this decade. Now there’s no reason to be up in arms about music because music has finally found a way to be inoffensive to large demographics who believe that this decade of music is the best yet! But is it really?

According to an article on the Smithsonian Magazine website, science has proven that pop music has gotten worse, but it’s not due to its outrageousness as perceived by the previous generation.

Music has become “bad” not “worse” when compared to previous decades.

Over the past 5 decades, music has been increasingly homogenized, finally resulting in completely bland music, where the only innovation is that playing it as loudly as possible is perceived by this generation as being “novel, fashionable, and groundbreaking.”

This Just In From The News Desk!

Louder isn’t novel.

Louder might be fashionable among some.

Louder is definitely not groundbreaking unless it’s played so loudly that it literally cracks walls.

And no matter how loudly you play bad music, it’s still bad music.

Isn’t it time society stopped accepting watered-down examples of music from an industry that seems hellbent to leather on turning music into a pre-packaged, just-add-water (or alcohol) dish best served tepid … or perhaps lukewarm … maybe room temperature?

Elyse Bruce

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