Shakespeare In 5: The Two Gentlemen of Verona

A lot of William Shakespeare’s plays seem to take place in Italy which is strange seeing he lived in England.   Some historians say he did not visit Italy because he did not attend university and only had a grammar school education. Some historians say he was intimately familiar with Italy and must have traveled extensively — at least throughout all of Italy.

What some historians are overlooking is that maybe Will had friends who shared their travels and journeys through Italy with him which would make them today’s version of Internet search engines.

Regardless of how he came by his information about Italy, some of his most popular plays were set in cities in Italy that exist to this day, including Verona and Milan.


After a few weeks of enjoying the “Shakespeare In 5” series, I’m certain you have subscribed to this blog.  If you haven’t, don’t wait a minute longer!  You’ll be glad you clicked that “Follow” button so you can start being the first on your block to read these entries every Friday.

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Elyse Bruce
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E.B. Taylor
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Shakespeare In 5: Othello

William Shakespeare wrote about a great many social issues back in the day.  In fact, he probably wrote some of the earliest #BlackLivesMatter literature published and performed on stage.  He probably would have been the first to direct and produce a film if film had existed back in the 1600s but it wasn’t so he had to just go with print and live performance presentations.  Today’s Literary Schrödinger Equation takes on that well-loved and long misunderstood play, “Othello.”


Now that you have had a chance to take that Literary Schrödinger Equation in, please remember to subscribe to this blog, and if you haven’t already followed me on other social media platforms, be sure to check them out and follow me there as well.

Elyse Bruce
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Twitter:      @ElyseBruce

E.B. Taylor
Facebook:  @TaylorMadeTales

Shakespeare In 5: The Merchant of Venice

There’s something to be said about the original “Guys and Dolls” style play complete with gambling, crooks, loan sharks, molls, and more.  If you’re looking from something new under the sun, chances are it’s already been covered by William Shakespeare in one of his famous plays.


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Elyse Bruce
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Twitter:      @ElyseBruce

E.B. Taylor
Facebook:  @TaylorMadeTales

Shakespeare In 5: All’s Well That Ends Well

Sometimes what seem to be the most convoluted plots are straightforward and easy to understand once you get a feel for the playwright.    That seems to be the case with this play as the Literary Schrödinger Equation is applied to “All’s Well That Ends Well” by William Shakespeare.  It may have been 1602 when this play was written, but reads like something that might be pitched in Hollywood these days.  Check it out.

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Elyse Bruce
Facebook:  @ElyseBruceFanPage
Twitter:      @ElyseBruce

E.B. Taylor
Facebook:  @TaylorMadeTales

Shakespeare In 5: A Midsummer Night’s Dream

This week’s Literary Schrödinger Equation takes on Shakespeare’s play “A Midsummer’s Night Dream” which is, according to many, one of the most complicated of Shakespeare’s plays to explain.  By stripping away the extraneous aspects of the play, it becomes very manageable and relatively easy to understand.  In fact, some may think of it as the Elizabethan era’s version of the Keystone Kops.

So in a nutshell, this is what the play is about and that’s what happens.  Now imagine it being performed as a black-and-white silent movie, and feel free to laugh heartily at the slapstick aspect of Shakespeare’s wit.

If you aren’t already following me on social media, here’s where to find me.

Elyse Bruce
Facebook:  @ElyseBruceFanPage
Twitter:      @ElyseBruce

E.B. Taylor
Facebook:  @TaylorMadeTales

Shakespeare In 5: Love’s Labours Lost

First things first, I want to remind everyone that because William Shakespeare was English, he didn’t use American spelling in his works.  This explains why the letter U appears in the word Labours in the title of his play Love’s Labours Lost.  Shakespeare In 5.  Now that we’ve gotten that settled and out of the way, let’s see what this week’s Literary Schrödinger Equation has to offer readers.


These delightful and informative Shakespeare In 5 entries are the sort of overviews literature buffs or Shakespeare aficionados and everyday people love to share with friends, family, and foes.  Be sure to keep the circle of giving going by sharing Shakespeare In 5 with everyone you meet online.  They’ll appreciate you for thinking of them, and so will I.

If you aren’t already following me on social media, here are some links to make that happen for you, and see you next week!

Elyse Bruce
Facebook:  @ElyseBruceFanPage
Twitter:      @ElyseBruce

E.B. Taylor
Facebook:  @TaylorMadeTales

Shakespeare In 5: The Taming Of The Shrew

When you mention a play by William Shakespeare about a merchant living in Italy, pretty much everyone thinks of the Merchant of Venice.  Most people forget that there were other merchants who piqued Will’s literary interest and more than one of them lived in Italy.  Today, Shakespeare In 5 gives you The Taming Of The Shrew for your reading pleasure thanks to our Literary Schrödinger Equation.

With each new Shakespeare In 5 entry, readers are encouraged to share these entries with their family and friends, colleagues and comrades, and strangers … a lot of strangers.  After all, literature is a serious business and seriously, literacy is big business.

Don’t forget to follow me on social media.  Here are the links.

Elyse Bruce
Facebook:  @ElyseBruceFanPage
Twitter:      @ElyseBruce

E.B. Taylor
Facebook:  @TaylorMadeTales

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