Who Said That?

The graduates of McGill University who finished their degrees after World War II ended are the great-grandparents and great-great-grandparents of those who are graduating from university and college over 65 years later.  The quotes beside each graduates’ name speaks volumes of how they interpreted the world around them.  Since most of the quotes fail to acknowledge the author of the quote, I thought it would be fun to see how many of these quotes are recognized by those who follow or visit my blog.  Today’s quote is this:

Ah, make the most of what we yet may spend before we too into the dust descend.

Feel free to add the name of who you believe was — or may have been — the person who first spoke or first wrote those words, in the Comments Section below.

When The Greatest Generation Buys

Marketing experts put forth that the buying patterns of customers is largely driven by the era in which they were born. Furthermore, the generations have been defined as the Greatest Generation (1901 to 1911), the Depression Era (1912 to 1924), the Silent Generation (1925 to 1945), Baby Boomers I (1946 to 1954), Baby Boomers II (1955 to 1954) Generation X (1966 to 1980), Echo Boomers aka Generation Y (1977 to 1994), Digital Natives aka Millennials (1995 to 2004), and Generation Z aka iGeneration or Post-Millennials , colloquially referred to as “screenagers” (2005 to present).

Knowing what the dates are for each clearly defined group allows for more detailed insight into the buying patterns for each generation.

The Greatest Generation (1901 to 1911) was born when romantic classical music was at its height and musical impressionism, thanks to composers such as Maurice Ravel, Claude Debussy, Erik Satie, Sergei Rachmaninoff, and others, was making its mark on culture. Composers relied more on emotions and less on traditional forms so to evoke a softer, dreamier mood in compositions with passages that flowed into each other with less definition as to where each ended and began. Even the more aggressive pieces leaned towards a more passionate arrangement.

This group reached the age of majority as jazz became incredibly popular, with cities such as New York, Kansas City, and Chicago as hot spots for this musical style, with Chicago being the center of jazz.     The harmonies in jazz have their roots in classical music with some of the best jazz bass lines found in the music of Frederic Chopin, and followed the spirit of romantic classical music in the emotion based and not rule based form.

During this era, the economy went through astounding changes and especially in America, society transitioned from the progressive era into the new era. Consumer capitalism, business practices, politics, and more evolved into a modern version. Corporations were structured to become giants in manufacturing, finance, and entertainment. By the time the generation known as the Silent Generation started to arrive, two hundred of the largest corporations in America owned almost fifty percent of America’s total corporate wealth.

Two important words in society were efficiency and permanence. Society held financial security as a key value, and believed in the power of institutions. It was the babies born to the Greatest Generation that built the strongest economy in the history of America. They respected tradition, and enjoyed (and appreciated) being part of large-scale changes.

While very few from the Greatest Generation are still with us these days, the ones who are have set ways of doing business as consumers. They trust businesses that reflect the values of their generation and lean towards businesses that are recognizable (the way romantic classical music is recognizable) while being a little rebellious (the way jazz music is rebellious).

Elyse Bruce

Who Said That?

The graduates of McGill University who finished their degrees after World War II ended are the great-grandparents and great-great-grandparents of those who are graduating from university and college over 65 years later.  The quotes beside each graduates’ name speaks volumes of how they interpreted the world around them.  Since most of the quotes fail to acknowledge the author of the quote, I thought it would be fun to see how many of these quotes are recognized by those who follow or visit my blog.  Today’s quote is this:

The greater the man’s soul, the deeper he loves.

Feel free to add the name of who you believe was — or may have been — the person who first spoke or first wrote those words, in the Comments Section below.

What’s A Band-Maid?

Anyone who’s followed the latest music coming from Japan knows that J-Rock has a new supergroup:  Band-Maid

Rumor has it that Band Maid is a record label construct and that the band members were pulled together the way one pulls together a fashionable outfit.  In other words, it’s Spice Girls with more grit.  But is it metal?

Truth be told, the music has far more in common with glam rock than it does with heavy metal, right down to the outfits the band members wear.  The music lacks the chugging palm muting that’s associated with metal, and seems to favor slap bass (not metal) and the absence of double bass drums and the absence of percussion that’s complex and theatrical screams of rock, just not metal.

However, there are some who will say that it’s a subgenre of metal known as Kawaii metal.  Yes, Kawaii which is the Japanese word for cute.  So this is what you would think of as “cute” metal which, in many respects, seems to clash with what most people think of when you say metal.

According to Kawaii metal musicians, this genre is similar to j-pop when it comes to melody and incorporates metal elements, and the first to take this genre abroad was Baby Metal.

The shtick with Band-Maid is that they allegedly play their own instruments while dressed in French maid outfits.

So, like their counterparts Baby Metal, Band-Maid is making their presence known in Japan and abroad.  The questions to ask are these:  Is the world really ready for this, and is Band-Maid really a metal band?

Elyse Bruce

Idle No More: Indians Are History

According to Professor Sarah Shear,  associate professor of social studies education at Pennsylvania State University in Altoona, her research has revealed that a large percent of elementary and high school text books present Native American Indians in the U.S. as a population that existed prior to 1900.  Anything current that has to do with Indigenous peoples in America seems to be non-existent in 87 percent of textbooks used in schools.

Her research began when she taught an undergraduate class in multicultural education and the students in her class stated to her that all Indians were dead.  Shocked by her students’ misperception about Indigenous peoples in America, Professor Shear began digging into the reasons why students held this incorrect belief.

According to Lisa Wade, professor of sociology at Occidental College in Los Angeles (CA), this belief is reinforced by the use of “feathers, buckskins, and moccasins” as the visual used when the subject of First Nations peoples comes up.

It does not require many words to speak the truth.
Chief Joseph, Nez Pierce, 1840-1904

Stephen Bridenstine, graduate student in social and cultural history, researched mapping tools and discovered that some such as OpenStreetMap don’t label Indian reservations, MapQuest does, and Google Maps, until recently, only showed them at the “state view” level. In December 2014, the National Congress of American Indians (NCAI) congratulated Google on the collaborative work done with their organization to improve how reservations appeared on Google Maps.

The misappropriation of culture by sports teams, celebrities, and others further reinforces the belief that Indians are a thing of the past, and that in misappropriating the culture, those doing responsible are merely “honoring” the culture.

When a non-native person lays claim to Indian culture, it’s almost a claim of being related to a Cherokee princess.  The problem with that claim is that the Cherokee did not have kings, and without kings, there are no princesses.   What people tend to overlook is that there was a positive and a negative use of the term Indian princess.

The term princess was used by some as a term of endearment in the early 1900s. If a man referred to his wife as a princess, it was out of love, not because her parents were a king and a queen.  The term princess was also used as a derogatory term around the same time in some of the Southern states to refer to light-skinned mulatto women, and at a time when many Americans didn’t care to differentiate between an African-American and a Native American Indian.

It’s time to realize that most of what people think they know about Indigenous cultures is incorrect (sometimes to the point of mythology), and that most of what’s true about Indigenous peoples and history is ignored or rewritten to fit an agenda.

In 1999, the Montana Legislature passed into law HB 528 known as “Indian Education For All.”  The upswing is that racist attitudes towards Indigenous peoples has dropped significantly in the school system, and Native American Indians are known to be part of today’s society.

While it’s true that the Trail of Tears, the Sand Creek Massacre, the Wounded Knee Massacre, and the assimilation policies the American and Canadian governments hoped would wipe out Indigenous peoples as an ethnic group are responsible for the deaths of millions or First Nations peoples, these events did not make Aboriginals extinct peoples.

Humankind has not woven the web of life.
We are but one thread within it.
Whatever we do to the web, we do to ourselves.
All things are bound together.
All things connect.

Chief Seattle, 1854

It’s time people who aren’t familiar with the facts about First Nations peoples sat down and learned the facts instead of running on empty.  Your lives will forever be enriched by adding another layer of fact to history.

Elyse Bruce

SUGGESTED READING

Anachronism and American Indians
http://thesocietypages.org/socimages/2008/11/18/anachronism-and-american-indians/

The Case Of The Missing Indian Reservations
http://drawingonindians.blogspot.com/2011/05/case-of-missing-indian-reservations.html

NCAI Congratulates Google On Changes To Better Acknowledge Tribal Nations On Google Maps
http://www.ncai.org/news/articles/2014/12/19/ncai-congratulates-google-on-changes-to-better-acknowledge-tribal-nations-on-google-maps

Six Ridiculous Lies You Believe About The Founding Of America
http://www.cracked.com/article_19864_6-ridiculous-lies-you-believe-about-founding-america.html

Strange Tan Blotches In South Dakota: Indian Reservations In Online Maps
http://drawingonindians.blogspot.com/2011/02/strange-tan-blotches-in-south-dakota.html

U.S. Schools Are Teaching Our Children That Native Americans Are History
http://www.psmag.com/books-and-culture/u-s-schools-teaching-children-native-americans-history-95324

Who Said That?

The graduates of McGill University who finished their degrees after World War II ended are the great-grandparents and great-great-grandparents of those who are graduating from university and college over 65 years later.  The quotes beside each graduates’ name speaks volumes of how they interpreted the world around them.  Since most of the quotes fail to acknowledge the author of the quote, I thought it would be fun to see how many of these quotes are recognized by those who follow or visit my blog.  Today’s quote is this:

The noblest motive is the public good.

Feel free to add the name of who you believe was — or may have been — the person who first spoke or first wrote those words, in the Comments Section below.

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